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Instructions for authors

Articles

These guidelines describe the orientation, focus, and style practices of Direction journal. Book review information is in a separate section at the end.

  • Description. Direction is a semiannual publication of Mennonite Brethren higher education institutions in North America and the Canadian Conference and the U.S. Conference of the Mennonite Brethren Church. Sponsoring schools are Canadian Mennonite University, Winnipeg, MB; Columbia Bible College, Abbotsford, BC; Fresno Pacific University, Fresno, CA; Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary, Fresno, CA; and Tabor College, Hillsboro, KS. The founding motivation of these schools was to train pastors, missionaries, and lay persons to assist the church in its witness to Jesus Christ around the world. Direction is abstracted in both Old Testament Abstracts and New Testament Abstracts. Articles are indexed in Religion Index One: Periodicals (RIO). Book reviews are indexed in Index to Book Reviews in Religion (IBRR).
  • Purpose. Direction seeks to serve the Mennonite Brethren constituency but also the wider religious scholarly community. It provides a forum for addressing biblical, theological, ethical, pastoral, educational, and evangelistic concerns, from international as well as from local perspectives. It seeks to play a role complementary to, but distinct from, both scholarly journals of a technical nature and denominational periodicals. Published twice a year (approx. 100 pages per issue), its intended audience includes educators, pastors, conference leaders, and informed church members.
  • Contributors. Direction particularly invites contributions from Mennonite Brethren and other Mennonite scholars and church leaders. Articles are also considered from those of the wider scholarly community.
  • Subject matter. Direction carries full-length articles, short features, research notices, and book reviews. The Editorial Council particularly considers submissions concerning the following: theological and ethical issues, biblical studies, and matters related to church history (especially those having Mennonite Brethren implications); the relationship between Christianity and various fields of study such as literature, science, medicine, education, the arts, and philosophy; and the relationship of Christianity to cultural, social, political, and economic problems. The Editorial Council is open to controversial subjects. Poetry is published occasionally.
  • Length and substance. Articles generally range between 1500 to 5000 words in length. Those of about 3000 are preferred for feature articles, 1500–2000 for Ministry Compass. Manuscripts are judged on suitability for Direction’s audience, significance and relevance of the subject, organization, style, and readability. Articles should show evidence of a solid grasp of the subject, reflection, and research where applicable. Dogmatic approaches or sermonizing, cliches, and hackneyed expressions should be avoided. A lively readable style is desired.
  • Style. The latest editions of Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, The Chicago Manual of Style, and the Mennonite Publishing House Supplement (to CMS) are usually followed (re: CMS, authors may find more accessible, Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers, University of Chicago). When giving Bible quotations, the version should be specified. Biblical spellings should conform to the New Revised Standard Version unless there is a direct quote from another version. Writers are urged to employ gender-inclusive language in relation to human beings and to keep gender references in relation to the deity to a minimum.

    The author’s name, complete address (both e-mail and regular mail), and proposed by-line (e.g., position, school) should appear at the end of the article. Authors should also provide a statement of self-description, including matters of motivation or qualification related to their topic, which can be posted in the journal at the bottom of the article’s title page.

  • Foreign languages. Foreign words should be italicized. Biblical (Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek) and related languages should be transliterated according to The SBL Handbook of Style, Hendrickson. See that source for other technical matters related to biblical studies and ancient cultures.
  • Copyright. Direction maintains copyright privileges of published materials. Permission for publication of articles elsewhere should be secured from the Managing Editor (permission to reproduce an article is freely given for academic purposes). Direction does not pay for articles. Authors of feature articles receive two complimentary copies of the issue in which their article appears. Contributors of smaller articles and book reviews receive one copy.
  • Submission. Articles should be submitted in electronic format if at all possible. This may be attached to an email message to the editor, or sent by disk (c/o Vic Froese, Canadian Mennonite University, 500 Shaftesbury Blvd., Winnipeg, MB, Canada, R3P 2N2). Please indicate operating system, word processor, and version. A hard copy is no longer necessary.
  • Citation examples: Documentation should be complete. Direction authors may choose either (1) note format (endnote), or (2) in-text citation format. Use of the note format entails that no additional bibliography list is required. Reference materials of interest which are otherwise not cited may be included in a final note. If in-text citation is chosen, authors list their sources at the end of the article in either (2a) bibliography, or (2b) works cited formats.

    (1) Notes

    1. Robert M. Grant, A Short History of the Interpretation of the Bible, rev. ed. (New York: Macmillan, 1963), 122–24.
    2. Grant, 119. [Correct when reference is to the immediately preceding note.]
    3. Robert von Hallberg, ed., Canons (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press), 100–102. [This way of citing the page nos. is correct because the first page no. is an exact hundred, 100, 200, 300, etc.; cf. to note #6.]
    4. Elmer A. Martens, “Ezekiel’s Contribution to a Biblical Theology of Mission,” Direction 28 (spring 1999): 75–77.
    5. Grant, Short History, 187. [Correct when reference is to an earlier note but not to the immediately preceding one.]
    6. Timothy J. Geddert, Mark, Believers Church Bible Commentary (Scottdale, PA: Herald, 2001), 102–3.
    7. Martens, “Ezekiel’s Contribution,” 79.
    8. Robert S. Kreider and Rachel Waltner Goossen, When Good People Quarrel (Scottdale, PA: Herald, 1989), 89.
    9. Paul Toews, “Religious Idealism and Academic Vocation at Fresno Pacific College,” in Models for Christian Higher Education, ed. Richard T. Hughes (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1997), 224.
    10. Doug Barkman, “Deliver Us from Evil: A Ministry of Demonic Deliverance,” Mennonite Brethren Herald, 26 June 1998, 4–6.
    11. Walter Unger, “Bible Colleges and Institutes,” in Mennonite Encyclopedia, vol. 5 (Scottdale, PA: Herald, 1990), 73–76.
    12. Friedrich Baumgärtel and Johannes Behm, “kardia,” in Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, vol. 3 (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1965), 606–7.
    13. Michael Vertin, “Lonergan on Consciousness: Is There a Fifth Level?” Method: Journal of Lonergan Studies 12, no. 2 (1994): 36.
    14. William J. Mitchell, City of Bits: Space, Place, and the Infobahn [book on-line] (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1995, accessed 29 September 1995); available from http://www-mitpress.mit.edu:80/City_of_Bits/Pulling_Glass/index.html; Internet.
    15. Gerhard von Rad, Wisdom in Israel, trans. James D. Martin (Nashville, TN: Abingdon, 1972), 9.
    16. Fred R. Belk, “The Great Trek of the Russian Mennonites to Central Asia, 1880–1884” (PhD diss., Oklahoma State University, 1973), 22.
    17. “A Statement of Position of the General Conference of the Mennonite Church of North America in Regard to Any Proposed Program of Universal Military Training” (Center for Mennonite Brethren Studies, Hillsboro, Kansas, mimeographed, 1945), 1. [no author, mimeographed]
    18. Harold S. Bender, “A Historical Review of the Anabaptist/Mennonite Position and Practice from 1525 to the Present” (Center for Mennonite Brethren Studies, Hillsboro, Kansas, mimeographed, n.d., call code MS), 1.
    19. John Pungente and Monty Williams, Finding God in the Dark: Taking the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius to the Movies (Ottawa, ON: Novalis; Boston, MA: Pauline, 2004), 32.

    (2) In-text citation

    • (Geddert, 34)
    • (von Rad, 9)
    • (Kreider and Goossen, 99)
    • (Waltke et al., 50)
    • (Vertin, 19; Mitchell, 47)

    When using in-text citation with the bibliography format, a portion of a work’s title will need to be given if there is more than one work by the same author or authors; this is similar to the way subsequent references are given in the Notes format.

    • (Ladd, Presence, 65)
    • (Martens, “Ezekiel’s Contribution,” 79)

    When the works cited format is used, include the work’s date only if there is more than one work by the same author. If two works by an author were published in the same year, distinguish by attaching letters to the date as in the second example below.

    • (Geddert 2001, 34)
    • (Ladd 1974a, 56)

    Biblical citations should abbreviate the book name only when in parentheses or notes: Psalm 44:23–26, but (Ps 44:23–26). If a passage is quoted, the version should be indicated: (Eccl 4:7–8 NRSV). If quotations are from the same version throughout the article, indicate in the first citation as follows: (Jer 5:12 NIV, passim).

    (2a) Bibliography

    • Barkman, Doug. “Deliver Us from Evil: A Ministry of Demonic Deliverance.” Mennonite Brethren Herald, 26 June 1998, 4–6.
    • Baumgärtel, Friedrich, and Johannes Behm. “kardia.” In Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, vol. 3, 605–14. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1965.
    • Belk, Fred R. “The Great Trek of the Russian Mennonites to Central Asia, 1880–1884.” Ph.D. diss., Oklahoma State University, 1973.
    • Board of Faith and Life. Mennonite Brethren Confession of Faith: Commentary and Pastoral Application. Winnipeg, MB, and Hillsboro, KS: Kindred, 2000.
    • Geddert, Timothy J. Mark. Believers Church Bible Commentary. Scottdale, PA: Herald, 2001.
    • Hallberg, Robert von, ed. Canons. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1984.
    • Kreider, Robert S., and Rachel Waltner Goossen. When Good People Quarrel. Scottdale, PA: Herald, 1989.
    • Ladd, George E. The Presence of the Future. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1974.
    • ———. A Theology of the New Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1974.
    • Martens, Elmer A. “Ezekiel’s Contribution to a Biblical Theology of Mission.” Direction 28 (spring 1999): 75–87. [Season/month or issue no. (but not both) acceptable but not required when journal is paginated through a volume.]
    • Mitchell, William J. City of Bits: Space, Place, and the Infobahn. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1995. Book on-line. Accessed 29 September 1995; available from http://www-mitpress.mit.edu:80/City_of_Bits/Pulling_Glass/index.html; Internet.
    • Pungente, John, and Monty Williams. Finding God in the Dark: Taking the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius to the Movies. Ottawa, ON: Novalis; Boston, MA: Pauline, 2004.
    • Rad, Gerhard von. Wisdom in Israel. Translated by James D. Martin. Nashville, TN: Abingdon, 1972.
    • Toews, Paul. “Religious Idealism and Academic Vocation at Fresno Pacific College.” In Models for Christian Higher Education, ed. Richard T. Hughes, 222–42. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1997.
    • Vertin, Michael. “Lonergan on Consciousness: Is There a Fifth Level?” Method: Journal of Lonergan Studies 12, no. 2 (1994): 1–36.
    • Unger, Walter. “Bible Colleges and Institutes.” In Mennonite Encyclopedia, vol. 5, 73–76. Scottdale, PA: Herald, 1990.

    (2b) Works cited

    • Barkman, Doug. 1998. Deliver us from evil: A ministry of demonic deliverance. Mennonite Brethren Herald, 26 June, 4–6.
    • Baumgärtel, Friedrich, and Johannes Behm. 1965. kardia. In Theological dictionary of the New Testament, vol. 3, 605–14. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans.
    • Belk, Fred R. 1973. The great trek of the Russian Mennonites to central Asia, 1880–1884. Ph.D. diss., Oklahoma State University.
    • Eichrodt, Walther. 1956. Man in the Old Testament. Translated by K. and R. Gregor Smith. London: SCM.
    • Geddert, Timothy J. 2001. Mark. Believers Church Bible Commentary. Scottdale, PA: Herald.
    • Hallberg, Robert von, ed. 1984. Canons. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.
    • Kreider, Robert S., and Rachel Waltner Goossen. 1989. When good people quarrel. Scottdale, PA: Herald.
    • Ladd, George E. 1974a. The presence of the future. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans.
    • ———. 1974b. A theology of the New Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans.
    • Martens, Elmer A. 1999. Ezekiel’s contribution to a biblical theology of mission. Direction 28 (spring): 75–87. [Season/month or issue no. (but not both) acceptable but not required when journal is paginated through a volume.]
    • Mitchell, William J. 1995. City of bits: Space, place, and the infobahn. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Book on-line. Accessed 29 September 1995; available from http://www-mitpress.mit.edu:80/City_of_Bits/Pulling_Glass/index.html; Internet.
    • Rad, Gerhard von. 1972. Wisdom in Israel. Translated by James D. Martin. Nashville, TN: Abingdon.
    • Toews, Paul. 1997. Religious idealism and academic vocation at Fresno Pacific College. In Models for Christian higher education, ed. Richard T. Hughes, 222–42. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans.
    • Vertin, Michael. 1994. Lonergan on consciousness: Is there a fifth level? Method: Journal of Lonergan Studies 12, no. 2: 1–36.
    • Unger, Walter. 1990. Bible colleges and institutes. In Mennonite encyclopedia, vol. 5, 73–76. Scottdale, PA: Herald.
    • Willow Creek Church. Membership principles; available from www.willowcreek.org/membership/principles.asp; Internet; accessed 10 December 2003.

Book reviews

  • General Policy. Direction reviews scholarly and semi-scholarly books from a variety of disciplines. Within this interdisciplinary approach, the focus will be the following types of books: (1) books about the Mennonite Brethren; (2) books written by Mennonite Brethren authors that are of interest to Mennonite Brethren readers; (3) books about the wider Mennonite community; and (4) books on issues that are of particular interest to a Mennonite Brethren audience.
  • Review Guidelines. Reviews should adhere to the following guidelines and total about 350 to 750 words. The Book Review Editor will usually specify a length limit for a particular book. Reviewers should confer with the Book Review Editor if they believe the book merits longer treatment.
    1. Describe the book’s content and the author’s credentials. Approximately three-fourths of the review should be devoted to a description of what the book is about. The review should not be a reviewer’s essay on the topic with occasional reference to the book itself. A one- or two-sentence description of the author’s credentials should appear early in the review, if they are known.
    2. Evaluate its contribution to knowledge. The review should discuss briefly the book’s most significant strengths or weaknesses and indicate whether it makes a substantial contribution to existing knowledge.
    3. Provide a comparison with similar works. If this information is known to the reviewer, he or she should indicate whether the book is one of the better works on the subject, whether it supplants an older work, or whether existing works provide a more effective treatment.
    4. Indicate the intended audience. Indicate whether the book is written for professional academicians, church workers, college students, or for the general adult reading public. A one-sentence description of the intended audience will be sufficient.
    5. List bibliographic information at the top of the review. Utilize the following format, changing the information as it pertains to the book being reviewed:

      Werner O. Packull, Mysticism and the Early South German–Austrian Movement, 1525–1531. Scottdale, PA: Herald, 1977. 252 pages.

    6. Reviewer’s name, position, and institution with its location should be at the end of the review:

      Richard Kyle
      Professor of History and Religion
      Tabor College, Hillsboro, Kansas

  • Submission. Reviews should be submitted in electronic format. Please attach the electronic file containing the review to an email message addressed to the book review editor (Paul Doerksen). A hard copy of the review is not necessary. Reviewers may keep the book(s) they review. They are not paid for the review, but will receive a complimentary copy of the issue of Direction in which it appears.

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